Jaguar Masters Part 1

 Master parts complete January 2017

Master parts complete January 2017

The plan from the outset is multiple copies of this model are to be built.  To that end, the parts shown here are master parts that will be molded and cast.  Also the size of this model is causing it to be broken up into manageable chunks to ease the casting process and not exceed the capacity of the mold making equipment. In an effort to make these parts cast-able only the base layer of detail has been added.  Many many more details are to come.

The parts complete so far are the fuselage portion from the engine intakes forward.  Windscreen, canopy and canopy rails, and LRMTS (Laser Range Marker Target Seeker) hatch.  The fuselage section an the canopy rails will be as in opaque material, and the rest in clear epoxy.  As of now this is the plan at hand, the parts are off to the mold making guru, and my fingers are crossed my plan comes to fruition.

On to some more photos:

 Loose assembly

Loose assembly

The parts fit well together, though not shown terribly well in this photograph.  The windscreen is a thin part and has an ever so slight warp in it, so with a little glue on final assembly the joint will be tight the rest of the parts will fall in line.

Examples of the cockpit details.  The first two are looking through the closed canopy to demonstrate the lack of distortion.  

 Panel surface detail

Panel surface detail

I am spending a good deal of time trying to replicate the skins and panels of the actual aircraft.  The master is skinned with thin aluminum sheet (0.005") that leave uniform gaps between each piece.  Uniform at least to the tolerance that I can cut and fit the pieces of the sheet together.  On the real aircraft areas where structural skin exist the joints are caulked, the resulting gaps are perceptible only on close inspection.  You will them only in close up photos.  Removable panels on the other hand are much more distinct and show from much further distances.  So in a effort to be true to the prototype aircraft, I "filled" the skin joints with primer.  Brush painting over the gaps and sanding away the excess.  Often it takes several repeats of the process to get the look I'm after. 

Finally some shots of the remaining details.  The cannon shrouds, and nose landing gear well.

That's it for now.  Until the next chunk!